Archiv der Kategorie: ESG

AI pollution illustration by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

AI pollution: Researchpost 185

AI pollution: Illustration from Pixabay by Gerd Altmann

AI pollution: 11x new research on varying environmental concerns, green investment market and growth, equity climate risk, AI for climate adaptation and AI pollution, ESG surveys, SDG scores and benefits of green corporate and government bonds (#shows SSRN downloads as of July 18th, 2024)

Ecoological and social research

Environmental concerns: “The development of global environmental concern during the last three decades by Axel Franzen and Sebastian Bahr as of July 10th, 2024 (#9): “… the average level of countries` environmental concern first decreased until 2010 but recovered in 2020 to the level observed in 1993. … Countries with higher GDP per capita tend to rank higher in terms of environmental concern. At the individual level, environmental concern is closely related to education, post-materialistic values, political attitudes, and individuals’ trust in the news media and in science” (p. 8).

Broad green market: Investing in the green economy 2024 – Growing in a fractured landscape by Lily Dai, Lee Clements, Alan Meng, Beth Schuck, Jaakko Kooroshy from LSEG as of July 9th, 2024: “The global green economy, a market providing climate and environmental solutions, … In 2023 it made a strong recovery from a sharp decline in 2022, with its market capitalisation reaching US$7.2 trillion in Q1 2024. However, headwinds remain, such as overcapacity issues and trade barriers related to renewable energy equipment and electric vehicle (EV) manufacturing. … Despite market volatility and increasingly complex geopolitical risks …, the green economy is expanding. Its long-term growth (10-year CAGR of 13.8%) outpaces the broader listed equities market. … Energy Efficiency has been by far the best-performing green sector, as well as the largest (46% of the green economy and 30% of the proceeds from green bonds), covering, for example, efficient IT equipment and green buildings. … Almost all industries generate green revenues. Technology is by far the largest sector (US$2.3 trillion of market capitalisation) and Automobiles has the highest green penetration rate (42%). … Newly issued green bonds now account for around 6% of the total bond offerings each year … meanwhile carbon-intensive bond issuance is approximately 2.5 times higher than green bond issuance each year. … Tech giants are concerned with their increasingly significant energy consumption and environmental footprints and are becoming the largest buyers of renewable energy. …  energy-efficiency improvement, which is another area of potentially rapid growth, is needed in areas including chips and servers, cooling systems, hyperscale data centres and energy-demand management” (p. 4/5).

ESG investment research (in: AI pollution)

Green investment growth potential: Household Climate Finance: Theory and Survey Data on Safe and Risky Green Assets by Shifrah Aron-Dine, Johannes Beutel, Monika Piazzesi, and Martin Schneider as of July 1st, 2024 (#4, for a free download a NBER subscription is required): “This paper studies green investing … using high-quality, representative survey data of German households. We find substantial heterogeneity in green taste for both safe and risky green assets throughout the wealth distribution. Model counterfactuals show nonpecuniary benefits and hedging demands currently make green equity more expensive for firms. Yet, these taste effects are dominated by optimistic expectations about green equity returns, lowering firms‘ cost of green equity to a greenium of 1%. Looking ahead, we … find green equity investment could potentially double when information about green finance spreads across the population” (abstract). My comment: It would be interesting to have a similar studyon social investments which unfortunately are even less common than serious green investments(my approach with listed equities see My fund).

Wrong ESG-questions? Sustainability Preferences: The Role of Beliefs by Rob Bauer, Bin Dong, and Peiran Jiao as of July 12th, 2024 (#97): “In this study, we formally investigate index fund investors’ return expectations towards ESG funds … Our methodologies encompass both the widely used unincentivized Likert scale questions and the incentivized Exchangeability and Choice Matching Methods. … Utilizing unincentivized Likert scale methods, we observe that a majority of investors expect that ESG funds financially underperform relative to conventional funds. Conversely, when applying the incentivized … methods, investors report consistent beliefs that are in contrast with their beliefs from the unincentivized Likert scale. What gives us additional confidence is that our incentivized methods elicit beliefs closer to investors’ true belief is that these beliefs also have a significant and meaningful impact on investors’ allocation choices. … the significant influence of investors’ return expectations on their allocation to SRIs underscores the importance of financial motivations in investment decisions related to SRIs. Therefore, return expectations play an important role in investors’ decisions involving SRI“ (p. 26 and 28).

Equity climate risk: How Does Climate Risk Affect Global Equity Valuations? A Novel Approach by Riccardo Rebonato, Dherminder Kainth, and Lionel Meli from EDHEC as of July 2024: “1. A robust abatement policy, i.e., roughly speaking, a policy consistent with the 2°C Paris-Agreement target, can limit downward equity revaluation to 5-to-10%. 2. Conversely, the correction to global equity valuation can be as large as 40% if abatement remains at historic rates, even in the absence of tipping points. … 3. Tipping points exacerbate equity valuation shocks but are not required for substantial equity losses to be incurred” (p. 6).

Equity climate risk return effects: The Effects of Physical and Transition Climate Risk on Stock Markets: Some Multi-Country Evidence by Marina Albanese, Guglielmo Maria Caporale, Ida Colella, and Nicola Spagnolo as of July 3rd, 2024 (#20): “This paper examines the impact of transition and physical climate risk on stock markets … for 48 countries from 2007 to 2023 … The results suggest a positive impact of transition risk on stock returns and a negative one of physical risk, especially in the short term. Further, while physical risk appears to have an immediate impact, transition risk is shown to affect stock markets also over a longer time horizon. Finally, national climate policies seem to be more effective when implemented within a supranational framework as in the case of the EU-28“ (abstract).

Adaptation AI: Harnessing AI to assess corporate adaptation plans on alignment with climate adaptation and resilience goals by Roberto Spacey Martín, Nicola Ranger, Tobias Schimanski, and Markus Leippold as of July 2nd, 2024 (#293): “We build on established sustainability disclosure frameworks and propose a new Adaptation Alignment Assessment Framework (A3F) to analyse corporate adaptation and resilience progress. We combine the framework with a natural language processing model and provide an example application to the Nature Action 100 companies. The pilot application demonstrates that corporate reporting on climate adaptation and resilience needs to be improved and implies that progress on adaptation alignment is limited. Further, we find that … integration of nature-related risks and dependencies is low“ (abstract). My comment: I miss studies on the experience with AI of ESG “rating” agencies. My data supplier Clarity.ai seems to be rather good in this respect, see Clarity AI named a leader in Forrester Wave ESG 2024 – Clarity AI

AI pollution: AI and environmental sustainability: how to govern an ambivalent relationship by Federica Lucivero as of March 12th, 2024 (#23): “While AITs hold promise in optimizing supply chains, circular economies, and renewable energy, they also contribute to significant environmental costs …. The concept of „digital pollution“ emphasizes the physical and ecological impacts of AI infrastructures, data storage, resource consumption, and toxic emissions. … “ (abstract).

Impact investment research (in: AI pollution)

Stable SDG scores? Sustainability Matters: Company SDG Scores Need Not Have Size, Location, and ESG Disclosure Biases by Lewei He, Harald Lohre and Jan Anton van Zanten from Robeco as of July 11th, 2024 (#65): “We investigate whether SDG scores, which evaluate companies’ alignment with the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals, exhibit similar biases that affect ESG ratings. Specifically, we document that SDG scores need not be influenced by size, location, and disclosure biases” (abstract). My comment: SDG-scores typically include very similar information as ESG scores. It would be interesting to investigate the value add of SDG-scores to ESG-scores. I prefer SDG-revenues as indicators for SDG-alignment.

Green impact: Greenness Demand For US Corporate Bonds by Rainer Jankowitsch, Alexander Pasler, Patrick Weiss, and Josef Zechner as of July 11th, 2024 (#26): “We document that institutional investors have a positive demand for greener assets. … In particular, the Paris Agreement signed at COP21 is accompanied by the highest greenness demand, and the US withdrawal from the same policy is associated with a significant decrease in greenness demand. … Bonds of firms with high environmental performance have, on average, significantly lower yields due to greenness demand, and vice versa for brown bonds. Furthermore, our findings reveal that insurance companies, with their consistent positive greenness demand, significantly drive these valuation effects. … Our counterfactual analyses allow us to quantify both the losses browner portfolios experience and the benefits for investors with a positive greenness tilt. These results point to the potential regulatory risks faced by investors due to uncertain future policies …  firms can derive significant yield reductions from improving their environmental performance. These benefits are larger for the brownest firms, and the benefits rise with greenness demand across the environmental spectrum. Despite this fact, we only find evidence that green firms react to changes in demand by improving their greenness in periods following high greenness demand, whereas brown firms do not. … we also show that green firms react to higher greenness demand by raising more capital via corporate bonds than their brown counterparts, as the former issue bonds more frequently and choose higher face values“ (p. 43/44). My comment: My approach of investing only in the companies with very good ESG-scores (see e.g. SDG-Investmentbeispiel 5) seems to be OK

Green catalysts: Sovereign Green Bonds: A Catalyst for Sustainable Debt Market Development? by Gong Cheng, Torsten Ehlers, Frank Packer, and Yanzhe Xiao from the International Monetary Fund as of July 12th,  2024 (#12): “… the sovereign (debt issuance, Sö) debut is associated with an increase in the number and the volume of corporate green bond issues. The stricter a country’s climate policy or the less vulnerable the country is to climate risks, the stronger this catalytic effect of its sovereign debut. … sovereign issuers entering the green and labelled bond market promote best practice in terms of green verification and reporting, inducing corporate issuers to follow suit. … The debut is a distinctive event for the liquidity and pricing of corporate green bonds; it increases liquidity and diminishes yield spreads in the corporate green bond markets. The same impact is not observed for subsequent sovereign green bond issues after the debut. Our empirical study shows that sovereigns’ entry into the sustainable bond market can spur corporate sustainable bond market development, even when sovereigns are latecomers to the markets. Sovereigns entering the sustainable bond market help to stimulate more growth in private sustainable bond markets as well as improve market liquidity and pricing. We also see scope for sovereign issuers to improve further market transparency, in line with the recommendations of NGFS (2022). Some jurisdictions have introduced supervisory schemes for green verification providers. To standardise or make mandatory impact reporting is another important step that might be considered in future regimes“ (p. 19). My comment: Currently, I only use bonds of multilateral development banks instead of government bonds for ETF allocation portfolios. But this research shows that giving money to Governments which do strange things from a sustainability perspective (= all) may be OK if green/social/sustainable bonds are used.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Werbehinweis (in: AI pollution)

Unterstützen Sie meinen Researchblog, indem Sie in meinen globalen Smallcap-Investmentfonds (SFDR Art. 9) investieren und/oder ihn empfehlen. Der Fonds konzentriert sich auf die Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDG: Investment impact) und verwendet separate E-, S- und G-Best-in-Universe-Mindestratings sowie ein breites Aktionärsengagement (Investor impact) bei derzeit 29 von 30 Unternehmen: Vgl. My fund.

Zur jetzt wieder guten Performance siehe zum Beispiel Fonds-Portfolio: Mein Fonds | CAPinside

SDG-Investmentbeispiel 5 Illustration von Clkr free vector images von pixabay

SDG-Investmentbeispiel 5

SDG-Investmentbeispiel 5: Illustration von Pixabay von Clkr Free Vector Images

SDG-Investmentbeispiel 5 ist Cardinal Health aus den USA. Cardinal Health hat einen positiven Gesundheits-Unternehmensimpakt. Es gibt aber noch keinen Investor-Impact durch den von mir beraten Fonds (zu Impact mit börsennotierten Wertpapieren siehe Nachhaltigkeitsinvestmentpolitik der Soehnholz Asset Management GmbH).  

99% netto-SDG-Vereinbarkeit und geringe ESG-Risiken

Cardinal Health hat seinen Hauptsitz und Hauptabsatzmarkt in den USA. Hauptaktivität von Cardinal Health ist der Arzneimittelvertrieb. Cardinal Health ist aber auch Hersteller und Vertreiber von Medizin- und Laborprodukten und Anbieter von Service- und Datenlösungen für Gesundheitseinrichtungen. 

Damit erfüllt Cardinal Health meinen wichtigsten Nachhaltigkeitsanspruch, nämlich Produkte oder Services anzubieten, die möglichst gut im Einklang mit den Nachhaltigen Entwicklungszielen der Vereinten Nationen (SDG) stehen. Cardinal Health ist dabei klar auf Ziel 3 „Gesundheit und Wohlergehen“ fokussiert. Nach meiner Einschätzung und auch nach der meines Nachhaltigkeitsdatenanbieters Clarity.ai sind fast die kompletten Umsätze gut mit den SDG vereinbar. Laut Clarity.ai erfüllt Cardinal Health auch alle für den Fonds relevanten Ausschlusskriterien. Wettbewerber von Cardinal Health dagegen führen Tierversuche durch bzw. nutzen genetisch veränderte Organismen.

Der aggregierte ESG-Score von Cardinal Health liegt bei sehr guten 75 von 100 im Best-in-Universe-Ansatz. Das Vergleichsuniversum besteht aus über 25tausend geraten Unternehmen. Mit über 85 ist der Governancescore besonders hoch und auch die Sozial- und Umweltscores liegen bei 60 bzw. sogar über 75 und damit erheblich über den von mir verlangten Mindestwerten von 50.

Shareholder-Engagement erst im Mai 2024 gestartet

Die Aktie von Cardinal Health ist erst seit Mai 2024 im Portfolio. Auf meine direkt nach dem Erstinvestment erfolgte Anfrage nach zusätzlichen Nachhaltigeitsinformationen habe ich bisher noch keine Antwort erhalten, obwohl ich bereits mehrfach nachgehakt habe.

Wie  in meiner Nachhaltigkeitsinvestmentpolitik festgelegt, frage ich dabei zunächst nach mir fehlenden Informationen zu ESG-Befragungen von Kunden und Mitarbeitern und Nachhaltigkeitsbewertungen von Lieferanten. Cardinal Health berichtet bereits GHG Scope 3 Emissionen und die CEO Pay Ratio im Vergleich zu durchschnittlichen Mitarbeitern, so dass ich und andere Interessenten prüfen können, ob diese sich befriedigend entwickeln.  

Die Unternehmen in meinem Portfolio gehören sowohl in Bezug auf Ausschlüsse als auch ESG- und SDG-Kriterien bereits zu den besten weltweit. Alternativinvestment scheiden nach diesen Kriterien etwas schlechter ab und es ist nicht abschätzbar, ob die Engagementreaktion bei diesen Unternehmen besser ausfallen würde. Deshalb führt eine unbefriedigende Reaktion auf meine Engagements bisher nicht zu einem Teil- oder Komplettverkauf der Aktien.

SDG-Investmentbeispiel 5: Zu groß oder gute Portfolioergänzung?

Cardinal Health ist eines von aktuell elf Unternehmen mit Hauptsitz in den USA. Mit knapp 40% haben die USA damit einen im Vergleich zu kapitalisierungsgewichteten Weltaktienindizes unterproportionalen Anteil am Portfolio, während Gesundheitsunternehmen besonders stark im Fonds vertreten sind.

Mit Ausnahme des Dentalspezialisten Henry Schein ist weder aus den USA noch aus anderen Ländern aktuell ein direkt vergleichbarer Wettbewerber von Cardinal Health im Portfolio.

Mit einer Marktkapitalisierung von etwas über zwanzig Milliarden Euro ist Cardinal Health das zweitgrößte Unternehmen im Portfolio. Seit der Aufnahme der Aktie ins Portfolio hat die Aktie dem Fonds einen leichten Verlust eingebracht.

Informationen zum Fonds

Bisherige Beispiele siehe

Nachhaltiges Investmentbeispiel 1

SDG-Investment 2: Handschuhe aus Australien

Impactbeispiel 3

Impactbeispiel 4

Insgesamt hat der von mir beratene Fonds seit der Auflage im August 2021 eine ähnliche Performance wie andere globale Small- und Midcapfonds (vgl. z.B. Fonds-Portfolio: Mein Fonds | CAPinside). In den letzten Monaten ist die Performance sogar deutlich besser als die der traditionellen Peergroup (vgl.  Globale Small-Caps: Faire Benchmark für meinen Artikel 9 Fonds?).

Wie in einem meiner letzten Blogbeiträge detailliert, bietet der Fonds im Vergleich zu durchschnittlichen traditionellen Small- und Midcap-Fonds damit bisher einen „Free Lunch“ in Bezug auf Nachhaltigkeit: Man erhält ein besonders konsequent nachhaltiges Portfolio mit Small- und Midcap-typischen Renditen und Risiken (vgl. Free Lunch: Diversifikation nein, Nachhaltigkeit ja? und Impactfonds im Nachhaltigkeitsvergleich.

Weiterführende Informationen zu meinen Portfolios gibt es hier: Das-Soehnholz-ESG-und-SDG-Portfoliobuch.pdf (soehnholzesg.com)

Disclaimer (in: SDG-Investmentbeispiel 5)

Dieser Beitrag ist von der Soehnholz ESG GmbH erstellt worden. Die Erstellerin übernimmt keine Gewähr für die Richtigkeit, Vollständigkeit und/oder Aktualität der zur Verfügung gestellten Inhalte. Die Informationen unterliegen deutschem Recht und richten sich ausschließlich an Investoren, die ihren Wohnsitz in Deutschland haben. Sie sind keine Finanzanalyse und nicht als Verkaufsangebot oder Aufforderung zur Abgabe eines Kauf- oder Zeichnungsangebots für Anteile der/s in dieser Unterlage dargestellten Aktie/Fonds zu verstehen und ersetzen nicht eine anleger- und anlagegerechte Beratung.

Die in diesem Artikel enthaltenen Informationen dienen ausschließlich zu Bildungs- und Informationszwecken. Sie sind weder als Aufforderung noch als Anreiz zum Kauf oder Verkauf eines Wertpapiers oder Finanzinstruments zu verstehen. Die in diesem Artikel enthaltenen Informationen sollten nicht als alleinige Quelle für Anlageentscheidungen verwendet werden.

Anlageentscheidungen sollten nur auf der Grundlage der aktuellen gesetzlichen Verkaufsunterlagen (Wesentliche Anlegerinformationen, Verkaufsprospekt und – sofern verfügbar – Jahres- und Halbjahresbericht) getroffen werden, die auch die allein maßgeblichen Anlagebedingungen enthalten.

Die Verkaufsunterlagen des Fonds werden bei der Kapitalverwaltungsgesellschaft (Monega Kapitalanlagegesellschaft mbH), der Verwahrstelle (Kreissparkasse Köln) und den Vertriebspartnern zur kostenlosen Ausgabe bereitgehalten. Die Verkaufsunterlagen sind zudem im Internet unter www.monega.de erhältlich. Die in dieser Unterlage zur Verfügung gestellten Inhalte dienen lediglich der allgemeinen Information und stellen keine Beratung oder sonstige Empfehlung dar. Die Kapitalanlage ist stets mit Risiken verbunden und kann zum Verlust des eingesetzten Kapitals führen. Vor einer etwaigen Anlageentscheidung sollten Sie eingehend prüfen, ob die Anlage für Ihre individuelle Situation und Ihre persönlichen Ziele geeignet ist.

Diese Unterlage enthält ggf. Informationen, die aus öffentlichen Quellen stammen, die die Erstellerin für verlässlich hält. Die dargestellten Inhalte, insbesondere die Darstellung von Strategien sowie deren Chancen und Risiken, können sich im Zeitverlauf ändern. Einschätzungen und Bewertungen reflektieren die Meinung der Erstellerin zum Zeitpunkt der Erstellung und können sich jederzeit ändern. Es ist nicht beabsichtigt, diese Unterlage laufend oder überhaupt zu aktualisieren. Sie stellt nur eine unverbindliche Momentaufnahme dar. Die Unterlage ist ausschließlich zur Information und zum persönlichen Gebrauch bestimmt. Jegliche nicht autorisierte Vervielfältigung und Weiterverbreitung ist untersagt.

Tiny houses: ai generated by GrumpyBeere from Pixabay

Tiny houses and more: Researchpost 184

Tiny houses: Illustration AI generated by GrumpyBeere from Pixabay

7x new studies on tiny and shared housing, climate-induced stock volatility, sustainability-led bonds, ESG-ETF divestment effects, hedge fund corporate governance effects, SFDR analysis, female SDG fintech power (# shows SSRN full paper downloads as of July 11th, 2024)

Social and ecological research (Tiny houses and more)

Tiny houses and & shared living:  Living smaller: acceptance, effects and structural factors in the EU by Matthias Lehner, Jessika Luth Richter, Halliki Kreinin, Pia Mamut, Edina Vadovics, Josefine Henman, Oksana Mont, Doris Fuchs as of June 27th, 2024: “This article … studies the acceptance, motivation and side-effects of voluntarily reducing living space in five European Union countries: Germany, Hungary, Latvia, Spain and Sweden. … Overall, the data reveal an initial reluctance among citizens to reduce living space voluntarily. They also point to some major structural barriers: the housing market and its regulatory framework, social inequality, or dominant societal norms regarding ‘the ideal home’. Enhanced community amenities can compensate for reduced private living space, though contingent upon a clear allocation of rights and responsibilities. Participants also reported positive effects to living smaller, including increased time for leisure activities and proximity to services. This was often coupled with urbanization, which may also be part of living smaller in the future” (Abstract). My comment: See Wohnteilen: Viel Wohnraum-Impact mit wenig Aufwand

Responsible investment research

Climate vola: Do Climate Risks Increase Stock Volatility? By Mengjie Shi from the Deutsche Bundesbank Research Center as of July 1st, 2024 (#23): “This paper finds that stocks in firms with high climate risk exposure tend to exhibit increased volatility, a trend that has intensified in recent years, especially following the signing of the Paris Agreement in 2015. … Institutional investors and climate policies help counterbalance the impact of climate risks on stock stability, whereas public concerns amplify it. My baseline findings are robust across alternative climate risk and stock volatility measures, as well as diverse country samples. Subsample analysis reveals that these effects are more pronounced in firms with carbon reduction targets, those in carbon-intensive industries, and those with reported emissions” (p. 23).

Bondwashing? Picking out “ESG-debt Lemons”: Institutional Investors and the Pricing of Sustainability-linked Bonds by Aleksander A. Aleszczyk and Maria Loumioti as of July 2nd, 2024 (#20): “… classifying SLBs into impact-oriented (i.e., ESG performance-enhancement and transition bonds) and values-oriented (i.e., bonds not written on ambitious and material sustainability outcomes or those issued by firms with less significant sustainability footprint). We find that investors equally price various degrees of sustainability impact in SLBs and likely pay too much for buying an ESG-label attached to SLBs that are unlikely to yield strong sustainability impact. We show that demand for sustainability impact is positively influenced by investors’ ESG commitment and strategy implementation and SLB investment preferences. Heavyweight ESG-active asset managers are more likely to purchase values-aligned SLBs. Focusing on investor pricing decisions, we find that new entrants and investors likely to benefit from adding impact-oriented SLBs to their portfolios are more willing to pay for impact. In contrast, investors with a preference for values-oriented SLBs are less willing to pay a sustainability impact premium“ (p. 31/32). My comment: I focus on bond-ETFs with already good ESG-ratings for my ETF-portfolios not on (“sustainable”) bond labels

Divestments work: The effects of Divestment from ESG Exchange Traded Funds by Sebastian A. Gehricke, Pakorn Aschakulporn, Tahir Suleman, and Ben Wilkinson as of June 25th, 2024 (#5): “We find that divestment by predominantly passive ESG ETFs has a significant negative effect on the stock returns of firms, especially when a higher number of ESG ETFs divest in a firm in the same quarter …. Such coordinated divestment results in initial negative effects on stock returns, increases in the firms’ equity and debt cost of capital and a delayed decrease in carbon emission intensities. There also seems to be a positive effect on ESG ratings, but only after 8 quarters” (p. 16/17). My comment: my experience with divestments is positive, see Divestments: 49 bei 30 Aktien meines Artikel 9 Fonds. Since then, I reinvested  in a few stocks which improved their ESG-ratings.

Good hedge funds: Corporate Governance and Hedge Fund Activism by Shane Goodwin as of Feb. 12th, 2024 (#159): “My novel approach to inside ownership and short-interest positions as instrumented variables that predict a Target Firm’s vulnerability to hedge fund activism contributes to the literature on the determinants of shareholder activism. … My findings suggest that Hedge Fund Activists generate substantial long-term value for Target Firms and their long-term shareholders when those hedge funds function as a shareholder advocate to monitor management through active board engagement“ (p. 155/156).

SFDR clarity? Sustainability-related materiality in the SFDR by Nathan de Arriba-Sellier and Arnaud Van Caenegem as of July 1st, 2024 (#19): “… we should think about the SFDR as a layered system of sustainability-related disclosures, which combine the concepts of “single-materiality” and the “double-materiality”. …  it is not the definition of “sustainable investment” which is relevant, but the additional disclosure requirements that apply as soon as a financial market participant deems its financial product to be in line with the definition. The SFDR encourages robust internal assessments over blind reliance on opaque ESG rating agencies and provides financial market participants with the freedom to justify what a contribution to an environmental or social objective means. This freedom sets it apart from a labeling mechanism with a clearly defined threshold of what a contribution should entail. The … proposed guidelines by ESMA for regulating the names of investment funds that involve sustainable investment … do not create a clear labelling regime” (abstract).

Other investment research (in: Tiny houses and more)

Female SDG power: Measuring Fintech’s Commitment to Sustainable Development Goals by Víctor Giménez García, Isabel Narbón-Perpiñá, Diego Prior Jiménez and Josep Rialp as of May 31st, 2024 (#8): “This study investigates the performance of Fintech companies in achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) … Our results show that female founders enhance Fintech sector’s alignment with the SDGs, specially in smaller companies, indicating that gender diversity in leadership promotes sustainable practices. Additionally, companies with more experienced founders and higher funding tend to prioritize growth and financial performance over sustainability” (abstract).

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Werbehinweis (in: Tiny houses and more)

Unterstützen Sie meinen Researchblog, indem Sie in meinen globalen Smallcap-Investmentfonds (SFDR Art. 9) investieren und/oder ihn empfehlen. Der Fonds konzentriert sich auf die Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDG: Investment impact) und verwendet separate E-, S- und G-Best-in-Universe-Mindestratings sowie ein breites Aktionärsengagement (Investor impact) bei derzeit 29 von 30 Unternehmen: Vgl. My fund.

Zur jetzt wieder guten Performance siehe zum Beispiel Fonds-Portfolio: Mein Fonds | CAPinside

Impactfunds illustration by Dmitriy from Pixabay

Impactfunds: Researchpost 183

Impactfunds illustration by Dmitriy from Pixabay

Impactfunds: 4x new research on right-wing policies, gender pay gap, AI and nature-reporting and channels of impactfunds (#shows SSRN full document downloads as of July 4th, 2024)

Unhappy rightists: Support for a right-wing populist party and subjective well-being: Experimental and survey evidence from Germany by Maja Adena and Steffen Huck as of June 26th, 2024: “… we establish a causal link revealing that individuals who are new or marginal supporters of the AfD exhibit deterioration in well-being … In addition, we establish a strong correlation between negative perceptions of personal and financial well-being and support for the German right-wing populist party AfD” (“Conclusion”).

Gender pay issues: One Cohort at a Time: A New Perspective on the Declining Gender Pay Gap by Jaime Arellano-Bover, Nicola Bianchi, Salvatore Lattanzio, and Matteo Paradisi as of May 2nd, 2024 (#263): “…we show that the entirety of the decline in the gender pay gap can be attributed to newer cohorts who entered the labor market with smaller gender differentials and to older cohorts who exited the labor market with larger differentials. … The data confirm that it was a significant decline in opportunities for younger men, rather than substantial gains for younger women, that drove the convergence in labor-market outcomes that occurred in the 1970s through the mid-1990s. After this point, the remaining gender gap at labor-market entry reflected mostly gender differences in educational choices, rather than differences in initial job allocations. Therefore, further increases in the number of older workers has continued to create bottlenecks to the careers of all younger workers, but not differentially between men and women” (p. 26/27).

Disclosure-deficits: Using AI to Assess the Decision-Usefulness of Corporates’ Nature-related Disclosures by Chiara Colesanti Senni, Saeid Ashraf Vaghefi, Tushar Manekar, Tobias Schimanski, and Markus Leippold as of June 10th, 2024 (#158): “Nature-related disclosures by companies are insufficient. As long as they remain voluntary, this situation is unlikely to improve, even under well-intentioned initiatives like the Task Force on Nature-related Financial Disclosures (TNFD). … our sentiment analysis reveals that corporate disclosures predominantly report positive C2N (Sö: company-to-nature) impact. … we find that current CSR disclosures, although aligned with the TNFD, are not sufficiently decision-useful for stakeholders and lack legal enforceability” (abstract). My comment: That is why I try to engage companies to improve disclosures, see Shareholder engagement: 21 science based theses and an action plan – (prof-soehnholz.com). For the German version see “Nachhaltigkeitsinvestmentpolitik” at www.futurevest.fund

Impactfunds: The Impact of Sustainable Investment Funds – Impact Channels, Status Quo of Literature, and Practical Applications by Marco Wilkens, Stefan Jacob, Martin Rohleder, and Jonas Zink as of June 28th, 2024 (#1223): “… investment funds can, in principle, achieve impact through three impact channels which we systematize in an impact framework: engagement, portfolio allocation, and further effects. In a next step, the article provides an overview of the current status quo of research on impact investment. … Empirically, there are at least initial indications that an impact has already been achieved via engagement and portfolio allocation. However, there are also legitimate concerns that neither of the two impact channels will have the desired positive and material impact. There is therefore a growing need of information in this area, which could be met, for example, via impact grids for sustainable investment funds” (p. 23). My comment: Good research summary, ideas and concept. For my impactfund approach see My fund – Responsible Investment Research Blog (prof-soehnholz.com)

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Werbehinweis (in: Impactfunds)

Unterstützen Sie meinen Researchblog, indem Sie in meinen globalen Smallcap-Investmentfonds (SFDR Art. 9) investieren und/oder ihn empfehlen. Der Fonds konzentriert sich auf die Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDG: Investment impact) und verwendet separate E-, S- und G-Best-in-Universe-Mindestratings sowie ein breites Aktionärsengagement (Investor impact) bei derzeit 29 von 30 Unternehmen:  My fund – Responsible Investment Research Blog (prof-soehnholz.com).

Zur jetzt wieder guten Performance siehe zum Beispiel Fonds-Portfolio: Mein Fonds | CAPinside

Halbjahres-Renditen Illustration von Gerd Altmann von Pixabay

Halbjahres-Renditen: Divergierende Nachhaltigkeitsperformances

Halbjahres-Renditen Illustration von Gerd Altmann von Pixabay

Halbjahres-Renditen der Soehnholz ESG Portfolios: Vereinfacht zusammengefasst haben die Trendfolge-, ESG-ETF- und SDG-ETF-Aktienportfolios relativ schlecht rentiert. Dafür performten passive Asset Allokationen, ESG-Anleihenportfolios und vor allem direkte SDG Portfolios und der FutureVest Equity SDG Fonds sehr gut.

Halbjahres-Renditen: Passive schlägt aktive Allokation

Halbjahres-Renditen: Das regelbasierte „most passive“ Multi-Asset Weltmarkt ETF-Portfolio hat +7,2% (+5,4% in Q1) gemacht. Das ist ähnlich wie Multi-Asset ETFs (+7,0%) und besser als aktive Mischfonds mit +6,0% (+4,8% in Q1). Das ebenfalls breit diversifizierte ESG ETF-Portfolio hat mit +6,5% (+4,2% in Q1) ebenfalls überdurchschnittlich rentiert.

Nachhaltige ETF-Portfolios: Anleihen gut, Aktien nicht so gut, SDG schwierig

Das ESG ETF-Portfolio ex Bonds lag mit +9,3% (+6,1% in Q1) erheblich hinter traditionellen Aktien-ETFs mit +14,7% (+10,6% in Q1) und aktiv gemanagten globalen Aktienfonds mit +13,7% zurück.

Mit -0,9% (-0,3% in Q1) rentierte das sicherheitsorientierte ESG ETF-Portfolio Bonds (EUR) wie aktive Fonds mit -0,9% (-0,7% in Q1). Das renditeorientierte ESG ETF-Portfolio Bonds hat mit +1,6% (+1,6% in Q1) dagegen nennenswert besser abgeschnitten als vergleichbare aktiv gemanagte Fonds (-1.2%).

Das aus thematischen Aktien-ETFs zusammengestellte SDG ETF-Portfolio lag mit -1,4% (-0,2% in Q1) stark hinter diversifizierten Weltaktienportfolios aber noch vor einem relativ neuen Multithemen SDG ETF, der -4,8% im ersten Halbjahr verlor. Besonders thematische Investments mit ökologischem Fokus liefen auch im zweiten Quartal 2024 nicht gut.  

Halbjahres-Renditen: Sehr gute direkte ESG SDG Portfolios und Fonds

Das auf Small- und Midcaps fokussierte Global Equities ESG SDG hat im ersten Halbjahr mit +8,4% (1,4% in Q1) im Vergleich zu Small- (+1,4%) und Midcap-ETFs (+0,6%) und aktiven Aktienfonds (+5,8%) sehr gut abgeschnitten. Das Global Equities ESG SDG Social Portfolio hat mit +6,3% (+3,7% in Q1) ebenfalls sehr gut abgeschnitten.

Mein auf globales Smallcaps fokussierter FutureVest Equity Sustainable Development Goals R Fonds (Start 2021) hat im ersten Halbjahr 2024 eine ebenfalls sehr gute Rendite von +6,8% (+2,6% in Q1) erreicht (weitere Informationen wie z.B. auch den aktuellen detaillierten Engagementreport siehe FutureVest Equity Sustainable Development Goals R – DE000A2P37T6 – A2P37T und My fund – Responsible Investment Research Blog (prof-soehnholz.com).

Für Trendfolgeportfolios haben die zur Risikosenkung gedachten Signale vor allem Rendite gekostet, weil die Portfolios nach dem Marktausstieg aufgrund negativer Signale nicht von dem schnellen und starken Marktaufschwung profitieren konnten.

Mehr Details sind hier zu finden: Soehnholz ESG, siehe auch Excel-Download: Historische Zeitreihen der Portfolios.

Transition: by Clker free Vector Images from Pixabay

Transition? Researchpost 182

Transition: Foto by Clker free Vector Images from Pixabay

Transition? 16x new research on migration, green jobs, green innovation, EU taxonomy, ESG risks, ESG ratings, ESG confusion, diversity, proxy advisors and big tech (# shows SSRN full paper downloads as of June 27th, 2024)

Social research (Transition)

Germans against migrants? Discrimination in the General Population by Silvia Angerer, Hanna Brosch, Daniela Glätzle-Rützler, Philipp Lergetporer, and Thomas Rittmannsberger as of May 30th, 2024 (#7): “In our incentivized allocation experiment with more than 2,000 participants representative of the German adult population … We find that discrimination against … Turkish migration background is widespread and substantial in size. Our causal moderation analysis indicates that while all migrant subgroups face discrimination, those with a better education and females experience significantly less. Furthermore, we find higher levels of discrimination among male decision makers, non-migrants, participants with right-wing political preferences, and residents of regions with a lower migrant share“(p. 13).

Inexpensive migration? Local Fiscal Effects of Immigration in Germany by Simone Maxand, Hend Sallam as of June 25th, 2024 (#7): “We … investigate how the share of the local foreign population affects public finances mainly at the district level. Our analysis utilizes regional administrative data for Germany at the district level, inspecting the period from 2010 to 2019 … our findings … suggest that the foreigners’ share insignificantly impacts collected tax revenues and public investment spending at the district level. … we find that the share of foreigners negatively influences the enrollment rate for children under three in childcare facilities… . By contrast, the share of foreigners in a district does not seem to significantly impact emergency public health spending and public staffing“ (p. 27/28).

Migration emotions beat facts: News, Emotions, and Policy Views on Immigration by Elena Manzoni, Elie Murard, Simone Quercia, and Sara Tonini as of May 29th, 2024 (#9): “We find evidence that the emotional reaction to the news of a rape committed by an immigrant moves policy views, with a significant increase in anti-immigration attitudes. Providing statistical information corrects factual beliefs … When presented in isolation, information tends to reduce anti-immigration views as it makes participants realize that the percentage of crime committed by immigrants is lower and that rape is a less frequent type of crime perpetrated by immigrants than what they previously thought. Yet, when information is combined with the rape news, the emotional reaction to the news dominates the beliefs-correcting effect of information: participants increase their anti-immigration views to the same extent as when exposed to the rape news only“ (p. 25).

Ecological research

Good green job pledges? Greenwashing the Talents: Attracting human capital through environmental pledges by Wassim Le Lann, Gauthier Delozière, and Yann Le Lann as of June 26th, 2023 (#93): “… we examine a climate movement initiated by elite French students … To hasten the sustainable transition of businesses, participants in the climate movement threatened to boycott job offers from polluting employers. … environmental pledges have a strong effect on intentions to refuse to work for polluting employers: respondents initially intending to refuse a job offer from a polluting company are, on average, more than three times less likely to maintain these intentions after exposure to an environmental pledge. … Individuals who are not responsive to environmental pledges exclude large companies from their career perspectives, do not believe in the ability of a market economy and technological development to solve the ecological crisis, and support radical action in the name of ecology. … Our results … highlight that companies have incentives to strategically use environmental pledges to mitigate the adverse effects of negative organizational attractiveness shocks caused by a poor environmental responsibility” (p. 26/27). My comment: See HR-ESG shareholder engagement: Opinion-Post #210 – Responsible Investment Research Blog (prof-soehnholz.com)

Green job creation: The Greener, the Higher: Labor Demand of Automotive Firms during the Green Transformation by Thomas Fackler, Oliver Falck, Moritz Goldbeck, Fabian Hans, and Annina Hering as of June 19th, 2024 (#6): “… we exploit the poly-crisis triggered by unexpected escalations of trade conflicts and sustained by consequences of the pandemic and the war in Ukraine. We find green firms’ labor demand is significantly and persistently higher than before the outbreak of the poly-crisis, by 34 to 50 percentage points compared to firms with a focus on combustion technology. This gap widens over time …. Green firms systematically adjust labor demand towards production and information technology jobs” (abstract).

Green innovations: The impact of environmental regulation on clean innovation: are there crowding out effects? by Nicola Benatti, Martin Grois, Petra Kelly, and Paloma Lopez-Garcias from the European Central Bank as of June 19th, 2024 (#18): “We showed that highly polluting firms tend to respond to environmental policy tightening by increasing their innovation efforts in clean technologies in an economically significant manner, especially in response to large changes in regulation. At the same time, we largely observe no statistically significant change to their innovation efforts in other, non-clean technology classes. This finding suggests that innovation in clean technologies, is not necessarily crowding out innovation elsewhere. … We find that technology support policy and non-market based policy instruments tend to have a stronger impact on clean innovation compared to market-based policy“ (p. 32/33).

ESG investment research (in: Transition)

Willing-to-pay for sustainability: The EU Taxonomy in Action: Sustainable Finance Regulation and Investor Preferences by Henning Cordes, Philipp Decke, and Judith C. Schneider as of June 17th, 2024 (#7): “We investigate ten sustainability objectives of the European Union (EU) for investment products. Our focus is on Germany as the largest economy affected by the EU regulation and the United States (US) … We show that participants in both countries value the sustainability objectives of the EU, expressed by a significant willingness-to-pay. However, the level is substantially lower in the US. Further, we identify individual as well as group heterogeneity in preferences“ (abstract). … “For example, investors are willing to forego significantly more return for a mutual fund that contributes to, e.g., the protection of biodiversity, than for one that contributes to, e.g., the creation of a circular economy” (p. 41) … the most important objectives for our sample of German participants are mirrored among US participants” (p. 42).

ESG reduces risks: Portfolios mit geringem ESG-Risiko schneiden in Krisenzeiten besser ab von Valerio Baselli von Morningstar vom 20.6.2024: „… Stresstests für ESG-strukturierte Portfolios während dreier vergangener Krisen durchzuführen: der Subprime-Krise 2007-09, der Griechenland-Krise 2010 und der US-Schuldenkrise 2011. In allen Regionen und für alle drei Szenarien erzielten die Portfolios mit geringerem ESG-Risiko eine bessere Rendite …. Geringes ESG-Risiko führt langfristig zu einer besseren risikoadjustierten Performance. Betrachtet man die durchschnittlichen Renditen über den untersuchten Zeitraum (Dezember 2014 bis April 2023), so zeigt sich, dass Portfolios mit niedrigem ESG-Risiko ihre jeweiligen regionalen Portfolios mit hohem ESG-Risiko in allen drei Regionen bei der Rendite übertreffen … Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass sich Investitionen in Portfolios mit geringem ESG-Risiko besonders in den Sektoren Gesundheitswesen, zyklische Konsumgüter, Versorger und Grundstoffe lohnen“. Mein Kommentar: Der von mir beratene konsequent nachhaltige Fondsmit Fokus auf Gesundheit (und Versorger) hat bisher ebenfalls relativ niedrige Risiken

ESG confusion? Navigating the ESG-Financial relationship: A Sector-by-Sector Analysis of ESG Ratings and Financial Performance by Edmée Hogenmuller, Léna Tuvache, Anthony Schrapffer as of May 18th, 2024 (#152): “…data on 1298 international firms from 2012 to 2022 … reveals that the correlation between ESG scores and financial performance varies significantly by industry. Some sectors, like Energy & Transportation, exhibit stronger correlations with ESG scores … Credit-based metrics showed slightly stronger relationships with ESG scores than market-based metrics, while market-based metrics had stronger relationships with ESG risk ratings” (abstract).

Noncredible emitters (Transition 1): Credible climate transition plans: Insights from an AI-driven analysis of corporate disclosures by Nico Fettes from Clarity.ai as of June 2024: “Globally, across various sectors, only 40% of companies disclose their decarbonization measures and simultaneously quantify their contribution to achieving emission targets. Both are important criteria for assessing credible transition plans” (p. 1). “… only about 22% of all companies in our sample reported using carbon credits to achieve their targets” (p. 5) … “companies in certain sectors, including aerospace & defense and oil & gas, were found to be among the heavier users of carbon credits compared to other sectors … controversies also exist around the use of negative emissions technologies such as Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) or reforestation which are still in the early stages of development or have not yet been proven at scale. … across our sample, 38% of companies reported on the use of these technologies for target achievement … the share was much higher in the oil & gas and steel sectors, with over 70% …” (p. 6). My comment see Fraglicher Klimaschutz emissionsintensive Unternehmen | CAPinside

More brown investments (Transition 2): Burn now or never? Climate change exposure and investment of fossil fuel firms by Jakob Feveile Adolfsen, Malte Heissel, Ana-Simona Manu, and Francesca Vinci from the European Central Bank as of June 13th, 2024 (#14): “… we show that fossil fuel firms with high exposure to climate change raised investment in response to the Paris Agreement relative to firms with low exposure. Importantly, investment sustained current business models, while there are no indications that fossil fuel firms transitioned towards renewable energy sources nor less carbon-intensive production technology after Paris” (p. 29).

ESG-rating details matter: Is ESG a Sideshow? ESG Perceptions, Investment, and Firms’ Financing Decisions by Roman Kräussl, Joshua D. Rauh and Denitsa Stefanova as of May 31st, 2024 (#12): “… based on Refinitiv’s point-in-time (PIT) ratings product that ensures we … document false inferences about asset growth that would have been made about capital raising if using the standard Refinitiv product instead of the PIT data, which are primarily driven by the fact that the coverage of the standard Refinitiv dataset extends ratings back to time periods when investors did not actually have the information available in the scores. We find that higher environmental scores shift the firm’s capital structure towards equity and away from debt … Separately, we find that governance and social scores are not significantly associated with subsequent changes in either equity or debt issuance. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in ESG scores neither affect a firm’s opportunity cost of capital for new investment projects nor relax financing constraints, … we find neither that ESG upgrades raise firm valuation ratios nor that they lead to balance sheet growth. Rather, they lead to firms issuing equity to reduce net debt“ (p. 18/19).

Good “E” lowers risks: Corporate Carbon Performance and Firm Risk: Evidence from Asia-Pacific Countries by Eltayyeb Al-Fakir Al Rabab’a, Afzalur Rashid, Syed Shams and Sudipta Bose as of June 19th, 2024 (#9): “… using a sample of 9,212 firm-year observation from 13 Asia-Pacific countries from 2002–2021. … We find that CCP is negatively associated with firm risk … finding that the quality of country-level governance accentuates the negative association of CCP with firms’ total risk, idiosyncratic risk and systematic risk. … We also find that country-level business culture, emissions trading schemes (ETSs), climate change performance and attention to carbon emissions accentuate the negative association between CCP and firm risk“ (p. 32/33).

Diversity returns: Do investors value DEI? Evidence from the Stop WOKE Act by Hoa Briscoe-Tran as of June 21st, 2024 (#10): “… this paper investigates whether capital markets value corporate Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) initiatives. In 2022, Florida passed the Stop WOKE Act, which restricted DEI initiatives in the workplace. Upon the Act’s announcement, the market value of affected firms declined by 1.80 percentage points compared to others. The decline was more significant in industries where DEI is financially material and among firms with investors exhibiting stronger pro-social preferences” (abstract).

Other investment research (in: Transition)

Proxy questions: Seven Questions about Proxy Advisors by David F. Larcker and Brian Tayan as of April 29th, 2024 (#285): “The proxy advisory industry–in which independent third-party firms provide voting recommendations to institutional investors for matters on the annual proxy–has grown in size and controversy. Despite a large number of smaller players, the proxy advisory industry is essentially a duopoly with Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS) and Glass Lewis controlling almost the entire market.
In this Closer Look, we examine seven important questions about the role, influence, and effectiveness of proxy advisors” (abstract).

Big-Tech Finanzkonkurrenz: Mehr Geld, mehr Macht: Big-Techs im Finanzwesen von Carolina Melches und Michael Peters von Finanzwende vom Juni 2024: „In Südostasien und insbesondere China sind die Tech-Giganten tief in der Finanzbranche verankert. … In den USA sind ebenfalls Big-Techs mit einer Vielzahl an Finanzangeboten wie Ratenkrediten („Buy Now Pay Later“- Angebote), Sparkonten und Zahlungsdiensten unterwegs. In der EU bieten sie vorwiegend Zahlungsdienste an und werden vergleichsweise weniger genutzt“ (S. 4).

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Werbehinweis

Unterstützen Sie meinen Researchblog, indem Sie in meinen globalen Smallcap-Investmentfonds (SFDR Art. 9) investieren und/oder ihn empfehlen. Der Fonds konzentriert sich auf die Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDG: Investment impact) und verwendet separate E-, S- und G-Best-in-Universe-Mindestratings sowie ein breites Aktionärsengagement (Investor impact) bei derzeit 29 von 30 Unternehmen:  My fund – Responsible Investment Research Blog (prof-soehnholz.com). Zur jetzt wieder guten Performance siehe zum Beispiel Fonds-Portfolio: Mein Fonds | CAPinside

Impactfonds: Bild von Mastertux von Pixabay

Impactfonds im Nachhaltigkeitsvergleich

Impactfonds: Foto von Mastertux von Pixabay

Es ist schwierig, passende nachhaltige Fonds zu finden

Nachhaltige Investments sind kein No-Brainer. Ein Problem dabei: Nachhaltige Investments können sehr unterschiedlich definiert werden. Ich verweise meist auf das von mir mit entwickelte Policies for Responsible Invesment Scoring Concept der DVFA (DVFA PRISC, vgl. Kapitel 7.3 in Das Soehnholz ESG und SDG Portfoliobuch). Damit können Anleger, Berater und Anbieter ihre individuelle Nachhaltigkeitspolitik festlegen. Das ist einfach. Schwierig wird es, wenn die dazu passenden Investmentfonds gefunden werden sollen. In diesem Beitrag zeige ich, wie man das machen kann und welche Fonds besonders gut zu meinen Nachhaltigkeitsanforderungen passen.

Wenig überraschend ist, dass der von mir beratene Fonds dabei am besten abschneidet. Neu für mich war aber, wie stark die Unterschiede zu anderen Smallcap-Fonds sind, die den Fondsnamen nach mit meinem Fonds vergleichbar sein sollten. Das gilt auch für die Performance.

Was ist ein liquider Impactfonds?

Laut Bundesinitiative Impact Investing ist wirkungsorientiertes Investieren ein Investmentansatz, der neben einer finanziellen Rendite auch eine messbare ökologische und/oder soziale Wirkung erzielen soll.

Ich beschränke mich in dieser Analyse auf liquide Investments. Das heißt, dass ich nur Fonds vergleiche, die in börsennotierte Wertpapiere investieren. Damit werden Fonds ausgeklammert, die Empfängern direkt zusätzliches Eigen- oder Fremdkapital bringen können. Das reduziert den potenziellen Impact von Fonds.

Allerdings ist mir die jederzeitige Änderungsmöglichkeit von Investments sehr wichtig. Das zeigt sich daran, dass ich bisher schon 60 Aktien aus meinem im August 2021 gestarteten und aus 30 Aktien bestehenden Fonds verkauft habe (vgl. Divestments: 49 bei 30 Aktien meines Artikel 9 Fonds und das Engagementreporting auf FutureVest Equity Sustainable Development Goals). Verkaufsgründe waren überwiegend meine zunehmend höheren Nachhaltigkeitsansprüche und (relativ) verschlechterte Nachhaltigkeit der Aktien im Portfolio. Mit illiquiden Investments ist man meistens mehrere Jahre an diese gebunden. Das bedeutet, dass man ein relativ hohes Nachhaltigkeitsrisiko eingeht (vgl. Free Lunch: Diversifikation nein, Nachhaltigkeit ja?).

Man kann zwei Arten von Impactinvestments unterscheiden, nämliche solche mit Fokus auf den Impact der Anlagen selbst und andere, die den Impact von Anlegern Berücksichtigen (vgl. Impactleitfaden der DVFA DVFA-Fachausschuss Impact veröffentlicht Leitfaden Impact Investing und ähnlich Eurosif und Forum nachhaltige Geldanlagen, Marktbericht 2024 S. 13). Im ersten Fall sind das zum Beispiel Aktien und Anleihen von Herstellern erneuerbarer Energien. Im zweiten Fall ist das die positive Einflussnahme von Anlegern über Stimmrechtsausübungen und andere Formen von Engagement, um Investmentziele nachhaltiger zu machen.

109 diversifizierte Impactfonds?

In Deutschland werden aktuell ungefähr neuntausend Investmentfonds mit insgesamt 34.500 Anteilsklassen öffentlich angeboten (vgl. Fonds-Suche | DAS INVESTMENT Fonds Explorer). Ungefähr 4% davon bzw. 350 sind Fonds nach dem strengsten Nachhaltigkeitsartikel 9 der Offenlegungsverordnung.

Man könnte annehmen, dass nur Artikel 9 Fonds auch Impactfonds sein können. Das Forum nachhaltige Geldanlagen kommt aber zu anderen Ergebnissen. Danach fallen „fast 60 Prozent der Artikel-6-Mandate bzw. Spezialfonds … in die Kategorie „Impact-Aligned“ (FNG Marktbericht 2024, S. 20). Das erscheint mir sehr viel.

Für meine eigene Analyse habe ich mir die verfügbaren Fonds auf www.morningstar.de angesehen und nach Stichworten im Fondsnamen gesucht. Ich interessiere mich dabei vor allem für Fonds mit Impact und Sustainable Development Goals im Namen. Bei den sogenannten aktiven Fonds finde ich nur 582 von 62325, also 0,9% aller potenziellen Anteilsklassen mit „Impact“ im Namen. Hinzu kommen 0,4% mit „Sustainable Development Goals“ bzw. „SDG“ im Namen. Insgesamt finde ich sich so 84 unterschiedliche Impactfonds.

Ohne Transitions-, reine Engagement- und wenig diversifizierte Fonds

Dabei habe ich Fonds ausgeklammert, die Transitionen von schlechteren zu besseren Nachhaltigkeiten anstreben. Das wären zum Beispiel Paris-Aligned Benchmark (PAB) Fonds. Diese investieren in Aktien und Anleihen von Organisationen, die sich auf einem CO2-Reduktionspfad befinden. Darunter sind oft Unternehmen mit aktuell noch hohen Emissionen und wenig nachhaltigen Produktangeboten. Solche Fonds sind nach meiner Auffassung keine konsequenten SDG-vereinbaren Fonds, zu denen ich nur Fonds mit Wertpapieren zähle, die in Bezug auf ihre Produkte und Services bereits möglichst nachhaltig sind.

Man könnte auch noch die 134 Anteilklassen mit „Engagement“ im Namen nutzen. Darauf verzichte ich aber ebenfalls (wenn nicht SDG oder Impact zusätzlich im Namen enthalten sind), denn für mich sollten die Emittenten der Wertpapiere im Fonds vor allem mit den SDG vereinbare Produkte und Services anbieten. Wenn dann noch Shareholder Engagement dazu kommt, ist das gut. Aber nur Engagement ohne SDG-Vereinbarkeit reicht mir für meinen Impactansatz nicht aus.

Ich interessiere mich vor allem für potenzielle Wettbewerber für den von mir beraten branchen- und länderdiversifizierten Aktienfonds. Deshalb betrachte ich hier keine länderspezifischen oder branchen- bzw. themenspezifischen Fonds, auch nicht solche für erneuerbare Energien oder Mikrofinanz. Ich klammere auch Anleihefonds mit Fokus auf grüne, soziale und andere nachhaltige Anleihen aus, sofern sie nicht SDG oder Impact im Namen nutzen.

Dafür füge ich Fonds hinzu, die dem Global Challenges Index bzw. dem nx25 Index folgen. Der Grund dafür ist, dass mein Fonds manchmal mit diesen Fonds verglichen wird.

Bei den ETFs finde ich nur einen Impact-ETF mit Umweltfokus sowie nur zwei SDG-diversifizierte-ETFs, die ich beide in der Detailanalyse berücksichtige.  

Insgesamt erhalte ich so 109 „Impactfonds“. 34 davon sind Anleihefonds, 7 sind Mischfonds und 3 sind Protected- bzw. Garantie- oder Hedgefonds. Damit bleiben 65 Aktienfonds übrig. 37 sind globale Aktienfonds, die grundsätzlich alle Unternehmensgrößen abdecken (Allcaps),12 sind überwiegend auf mittelgroße Unternehmen (Midcap) fokussierte globale Aktienfonds und 5 sind regional fokussierte Fonds. Bis auf zwei regionale Fonds enthalten diese nur relativ wenige Smallcaps, die in meinem Fonds vorherrschend sind. Damit bleiben 11 überregionale Smallcapfonds für den Detailvergleich übrig.

Detailvergleich von 11 globalen sogenannten Impactfonds mit Smallcapfokus

Idealerweise wird ein Nachhaltigkeitsvergleich der von mir selektieren Fonds mit kostenlos verfügbaren und damit extern einfach nachprüfbaren Daten durchgeführt. Die mir bekannten derartigen Datenbanken sind jedoch wenig transparent, nutzen nur Best-in-Class ESG Ratings und/oder enthalten nur einen Teil der mich interessierenden Fonds und Nachhaltgigkeitsdaten.

Deshalb habe ich die Fonds mit der kostenpflichtigen Datenbank von Clarity.ai analysiert. Diese hat den Vorteil, dass sie – mit Ausnahme eines neuen ETFs – für alle 11 Fonds detaillierte SDG- und ESG-Analysen ermöglicht. Dabei werden möglichst alle Aktien einzeln analysiert und dann auf Portfolioebene aggregiert.

Bei der Interpretation der Ergebnisse ist zu berücksichtigen, dass solche Nachhaltigkeitsanalysen je nach Datenanbieter und Stichtag (hier: Mitte Juni 2024) unterschiedliche Ergebnisse ergeben können. Zu beachten ist auch, dass die Ratings oft annähernd normalverteilt sind, d.h. die Streuung in der Mitte ziemlich hoch ist und Ausreißer selten sind. Das bedeutet, dass ein durchschnittliches ESG-Rating von 55 gegenüber 50 einen erheblichen Unterschied bedeuten kann.

Nur 1 diversifizierter konsequenter Smallcap-Impactfonds?

Ich analysiere sogenannte unerwünschte Aktivitäten, ESG-Ratings und SDG-Vereinbarkeiten. ESG-Ratings fassen dabei ESG-Risiken inklusive Kontroversen zusammen, ohne finanzielle Aspekte zu berücksichtigen. Dabei nutze ich ein Best-in-Universe Rating. Das bedeutet, dass Umwelt-, Sozial- und Unternehmensführungsrisiken aller über fünfundzwanzigtausend gerateten Unternehmen miteinander verglichen werden und nicht brancheninterne (Best-in-Class) Ratings genutzt werden. ESG-Risiken haben eine mögliche Bandbreite von 0 bis 100 und SDG-Vereinbarkeit wird über SDG-vereinbare Umsätze gemessen, von denen vorher unvereinbare Umsätze abgezogen werden (Netto-Umsatz-Ansatz).

Die hier analysierten 11 Fonds investieren insgesamt in über 200 Unternehmen mit einigen von 37 von mir unerwünschten und vermiedenen Aktivitäten. Das sind vor allem in Unternehmen, die Tierversuche durchführen. Dutzende weitere Unternehmen haben Abhängigkeiten von fossilen Brennstoffen oder Waffen.

Die SDG-(Netto-)Umsatzvereinbarkeit ist mir besonders wichtig. Am besten schneidet dabei der von mir beraten Fonds Futurevest Equities SDG R mit 88% ab. Drei weitere Fonds liegen um die 80%. Damit sind für mich nur diese 4 Smallcap-SDG Fonds konsequente Impactfonds. Zwei davon setzen vor allem auf erneuerbare Energien, einer auf Gesundheit und nur der von mir beratene Fonds auf beide und weitere Segmente.

Zwei weitere Fonds haben etwas über 50% SDG-Umsätze. Für mich überraschend ist, dass für 6 Fonds unter 50% netto SDG-Umsätze ausgewiesen wird. Ein Fonds mit „SDG-Engagement“ im Namen schneidet mit 7% am schlechtesten ab. Das Fondsmanagement will mit seinem Engagement dabei offensichtlich relativ wenig nachhaltige Investments nachhaltiger machen.

Impactfonds mit ESG-Risiken

In Bezug auf die ESG-Risiken ergeben sich ebenfalls erhebliche Unterschiede: Auch hier schneidet der von mir beratene Fonds mit einem durchschnittlichen ESG- Rating von 66 am besten ab. Bei Governance gibt es mit 71 einen noch besseren Fonds im Vergleich zu den 70 des Futurevest Fonds. Mit 62 bei Sozialrisiken und 68 von 100 Punkten bei Umweltrisiken scheidet der Futurevest-Fonds aber am besten ab.

Drei Fonds liegen bei den aggregierten ESG-Ratings aber auch bei Umwelt- und Sozialem unter 50 und haben damit überdurchschnittliche Risiken. Alle anderen Fonds liegen zwischen 53 und 60 bei den aggregierten Ratings. Beim Governancerating geht die Bandbreite nur von 52 bis 71, bei Umwelt von 40 bis 68 und bei Sozialem von 36 bis 63. Dabei liegen 9 Fonds bei den Sozialratings unter 50.

Auch bei den Emissionen gibt es starke Unterschiede. So reichen die umsatzgewichteten Scope 1 und Scope 2 Emissionen von 41 bis 1503 Tonnen mit fünf Fonds über 100 Tonnen. Mit 54 Tonnen hat der Futurevest-Fonds die drittniedrigsten Emissionen. Die Scope 3 Emissionen reichen von 88 bis 3.650 (Futurevest: 665) und scheinen damit kaum vergleichbar zu sein. Fonds, die bei ihren Investments auf Scope 3 Reporting drängen, wie ich das machen, werden bei solchen Vergleichen tendenziell benachteiligt.

Engagementdaten der Fonds werden in der Clarity.ai Datenbank nicht aufgeführt. Hierzu wäre eine relativ aufwändige separate Analyse nötig (Infos zu Futurevest siehe „Engagementreporting“ auf FutureVest Equity Sustainable Development Goals).

Strengster Fonds mit guter Performance

In Bezug auf Ausschlüsse, SDG-Umsätze und ESG-Ratings ist nach diesen Daten der von mir beratenen Fonds der mit Abstand am konsequentesten nachhaltige. Das ist auch nachvollziehbar, denn ich nutze fast nur Nachhaltigkeitskriterien für die Aktienselektion.

Aber natürlich ist auch Performance wichtig. In Bezug auf traditionelle Smallcapfonds erreicht der von mir beratene Fonds seit der Auflage marktübliche Renditen und Risiken. Für die Analyse der selektieren Smallcap-Nachhaltigkeitsfonds nutze ich, sofern vorhanden, die thesaurierenden nicht-währungsgesicherten Retailanteilsklassen. Bezüglich der Renditen von Anfang 2022 bis Mitte Juni 2024 (der Futurevest-Fonds ist erst im August 2021 gestartet) liegt mein Fonds aktuell an der zweitbesten Position, direkt nach dem aus meiner Sicht wenig nachhaltigen SDG Engagementfonds. Im aktuellen Jahr liegt er sogar an erster Stelle. Und die Volatilität von etwa 13% ist auch relativ niedrig. Die Bandbreite der Performance recht dabei von +11% bis -59%.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Disclaimer

Dieser Beitrag ist von der Soehnholz ESG GmbH erstellt worden. Die Erstellerin übernimmt keine Gewähr für die Richtigkeit, Vollständigkeit und/oder Aktualität der zur Verfügung gestellten Inhalte. Die Informationen unterliegen deutschem Recht und richten sich ausschließlich an Investoren, die ihren Wohnsitz in Deutschland haben. Sie sind keine Finanzanalyse und nicht als Verkaufsangebot oder Aufforderung zur Abgabe eines Kauf- oder Zeichnungsangebots für Anteile der/s in dieser Unterlage dargestellten Aktie/Fonds zu verstehen und ersetzen nicht eine anleger- und anlagegerechte Beratung.

Die in diesem Artikel enthaltenen Informationen dienen ausschließlich zu Bildungs- und Informationszwecken. Sie sind weder als Aufforderung noch als Anreiz zum Kauf oder Verkauf eines Wertpapiers oder Finanzinstruments zu verstehen. Die in diesem Artikel enthaltenen Informationen sollten nicht als alleinige Quelle für Anlageentscheidungen verwendet werden.

Anlageentscheidungen sollten nur auf der Grundlage der aktuellen gesetzlichen Verkaufsunterlagen (Wesentliche Anlegerinformationen, Verkaufsprospekt und – sofern verfügbar – Jahres- und Halbjahresbericht) getroffen werden, die auch die allein maßgeblichen Anlagebedingungen enthalten.

Die Verkaufsunterlagen des Fonds werden bei der Kapitalverwaltungsgesellschaft (Monega Kapitalanlagegesellschaft mbH), der Verwahrstelle (Kreissparkasse Köln) und den Vertriebspartnern zur kostenlosen Ausgabe bereitgehalten. Die Verkaufsunterlagen sind zudem im Internet unter www.monega.de erhältlich. Die in dieser Unterlage zur Verfügung gestellten Inhalte dienen lediglich der allgemeinen Information und stellen keine Beratung oder sonstige Empfehlung dar. Die Kapitalanlage ist stets mit Risiken verbunden und kann zum Verlust des eingesetzten Kapitals führen. Vor einer etwaigen Anlageentscheidung sollten Sie eingehend prüfen, ob die Anlage für Ihre individuelle Situation und Ihre persönlichen Ziele geeignet ist.

Diese Unterlage enthält ggf. Informationen, die aus öffentlichen Quellen stammen, die die Erstellerin für verlässlich hält. Die dargestellten Inhalte, insbesondere die Darstellung von Strategien sowie deren Chancen und Risiken, können sich im Zeitverlauf ändern. Einschätzungen und Bewertungen reflektieren die Meinung der Erstellerin zum Zeitpunkt der Erstellung und können sich jederzeit ändern. Es ist nicht beabsichtigt, diese Unterlage laufend oder überhaupt zu aktualisieren. Sie stellt nur eine unverbindliche Momentaufnahme dar. Die Unterlage ist ausschließlich zur Information und zum persönlichen Gebrauch bestimmt. Jegliche nicht autorisierte Vervielfältigung und Weiterverbreitung ist untersagt.

ESG audits illustration by xdfolio from Pixabay

ESG audits: Researchpost 181

ESG audits illustration by xdfolio from Pixabay

ESG audits: 9x new research on migration, floods, biodiversity risks, credit risks, ESG assurance, share loans, LLM financial advice, mental models and gender investing (# shows number of SSRN full paper downloads as of June 20th, 2024).

Social and ecological research

Complementary migrants: Do Migrants Displace Native-Born Workers on the Labour Market? The Impact of Workers‘ Origin by Valentine Fays, Benoît Mahy, and François Rycx as of April 9th, 2024 (#34): “… native-born people with both parents born in the host country (referred to as ‘natives’) and native-born people with at least one parent born abroad (referred to as ‘2nd-generation migrants’) … Our benchmark results … show that the relationship between 1stgeneration migrants, on the one hand, and natives and 2nd-generation migrants, on the other hand, is statistically significant and positive, suggesting that there is a complementarity in the hirings or firing of these different categories of workers in Belgium … tests support the hypothesis of complementarity between 1st-generation migrants on the one hand, and native and 2nd-generation migrant workers on the other. … complementarity is reinforced when workers have the same (high or low) level of education and when 1st-generation migrant workers come from developed countries” (p. 22/23).

ESG investment research (in: ESG audits)

Corporate flood risk: Floods and firms: vulnerabilities and resilience to natural disasters in Europe by Serena Fatica, Gábor Kátay and Michela Rancan as of April 16th, 2024 (#76): “…. we investigate the dynamic impacts of flood events on European manufacturing firms during the 2007-2018 period. … We find that water damages have a significant and persistent adverse effect on firm-level outcomes, and may endanger firm survival, as firms exposed to water damages are on average less likely to remain active. In the year after the event, an average flood deteriorates firms’ assets by about 2% and their sales by about 3%, without clear signs of full recovery even after 8 years. While adjusting more sluggishly, employment follows a similar pattern, experiencing a contraction for the same number of years at least. “ (p. 35).

Too green? Impact of ESG on Corporate Credit Risk by Rupali Vashisht as of May 30th, 2024 (#23): “… improvements in ESG ratings lead to lower spreads due to the risk mitigation effect for brown firms. On the other hand, for green firms, ESG rating upgrades lead to higher spreads. Next, E pillar is the strongest pillar in determining the bond spreads of brown firms. All pillars E, S, and G pillars are important determinants of bond spreads for green firms. Lastly, improvements in ESG ratings are heterogeneous across quantiles“ (abstract). “… “findings in the recent literature substantiate the results of this paper by providing evidence that green companies are deemed safe by investors and that any efforts towards improving ESG performance may be considered wasteful and therefore, penalized” (p. 47). My comment: In may experience, even companies with good ESG ratings can improve their sustainability significantly. Investors should encourage that through stakeholder engagement. My approach see Shareholder engagement: 21 science based theses and an action plan – (prof-soehnholz.com) or my engagement policy here Nachhaltigkeitsinvestmentpolitik_der_Soehnholz_Asset_Management_GmbH

Independent ESG audits: Scrutinizing ESG Assurance through the Lens of Reporting by Cai Chen as of June 7th, 2024 (#33): “… I examine three reporting properties (materiality, verifiability, and objectivity) relevant to the objectives of ESG assurance (Söhnholz: independent verification) across an international sample. I document positive associations between ESG assurance and all three reporting properties … These associations strengthen with assurers’ greater industry experience, companies’ ESG-linked compensation, and companies’ high negative ESG exposure” (abstract).

Biodiversity ESG audits: Pricing Firms’ Biodiversity Risk Exposure: Empirical Evidence from Audit Fees by Tobias Steindl, Stephan Küster, and Sven Hartlieb as of as of May 14th, 2024 (#73): “… we find that biodiversity risk is associated with higher audit fees for a large sample of listed U.S. firms. Further tests reveal that auditors do not increase their audit efforts due to firms’ higher biodiversity risk exposure but rather charge an audit fee risk premium. We also find that this audit fee risk premium is only charged (i) by auditors located in counties with high environmental awareness, and (ii) if the general public’s attention to biodiversity is high“ (abstract).

Other investment research (in: ESG audits)

Share loaning: Long-term value versus short-term profits: When do index funds recall loaned shares for voting? by Haoyi (Leslie) Luo and Zijin (Vivian) Xu as of May 22nd, 2024 (#20): “… we analyze the share recall behavior of index funds during proxy voting and investigate the implications for voting outcomes. … We find that higher index ownership is more likely associated with share recall, particularly in the presence of higher institutional ownership, lower past return performance, smaller firms, and more shares held by younger fund families with higher turnover ratios or higher management fees. … a higher recall prior to the record date is associated with fewer votes for a proposal if opposed by ISS“ (p. 29). My comment: ETF-selectors should discuss if loaning shares is positive or negative.

AI financial advice: Using large language models for financial advice by Christian Fieberg, Lars Hornuf and David J. Streich as of May 31st, 2024 (#162): “…. we elicit portfolio recommendations from 32 LLMs for 64 investor profiles differing with respect to their risk tolerance and capacity, home country, sustainability preferences, gender, and investment experience. To assess the quality of the recommendations, we investigate the implementability, exposure, and historical performance of these portfolios. We find that LLMs are generally capable of generating financial advice as the recommendations can in fact be implemented, take into account investor circumstances when determining exposure to markets and risk, and display historical performance in line with the risks assumed. We further find that foundation models are better suited to provide financial advice than fine-tuned models and that larger models are better suited to provide financial advice than smaller models. … We find no difference in performance for either of the model features. Based on these results, we discuss the potential application of LLMs in the financial advice context“ (abstract).

Mental constraints? Mental Models in Financial Markets: How Do Experts Reason about the Pricing of Climate Risk? by Rob Bauer, Katrin Gödker, Paul Smeets, and Florian Zimmermann as of June 3rd, 2024 (#175): “We investigate financial experts’ beliefs about climate risk pricing and analyze how those beliefs influence stock return expectations. … most experts share the view that climate risks are insufficiently reflected in stock prices, yet they hold heterogeneous beliefs about the source and persistence of the mispricing. … Differences in experts’ mental models explain variation in return expectations in the short-term (1-year) and long-term (10-year). Furthermore, we document that experts’ political leanings and geography determine the type of mental model they hold” (abstract).

Gender investments: Gender effects in intra-couple investment decision-making: risk attitude and risk and return expectations by Jan-Christian Fey, Carolin E. Hoeltken, and Martin Weber as of Nov. 29th, 2023 (#147): “Using representative data on German households … we show that the relation between gender, risk attitudes (both in general and financial matters) and risky investment is much more complex than prior literature has acknowledged. … This analysis has shown that risk-loving, wife-headed households seem to have a less optimistic risk and return assessment than their husband-headed counterparts. Overall, 40 percent of the 10.57 percentage point gap in capital market participation potentially arises from a less favourable view on investment Sharpe ratios taken by female financial heads. … General risk attitudes are our preferred measure of innate risk attitudes since the financial risk attitude question can easily be contaminated by financial constraints, and understood by survey participants as a question of their capacity to take risks rather than their willingness“ (p. 42/43).

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Werbehinweis

Unterstützen Sie meinen Researchblog, indem Sie in meinen globalen Smallcap-Investmentfonds (SFDR Art. 9) investieren und/oder ihn empfehlen. Der Fonds konzentriert sich auf die Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDG: Investment impact) und verwendet separate E-, S- und G-Best-in-Universe-Mindestratings sowie ein breites Aktionärsengagement (Investor impact) bei derzeit 29 von 30 Unternehmen:  My fund – Responsible Investment Research Blog (prof-soehnholz.com). Zur jetzt wieder guten Performance siehe zum Beispiel Fonds-Portfolio: Mein Fonds | CAPinside

Impactbeispiel 4 mit einem Foto von Gerd Altmann von Pixabay

Impactbeispiel 4

Impactbeispiel 4 mit einem Foto von Gerd Altmann von Pixabay

Impactbeispiel 4 ist Biotage aus Schweden. Biotage hat durch seine Aktivitäten einen positiven Unternehmensimpact vor allem in Bezug auf Gesundheit. Mein Investor-Impact durch den von mir beraten Fonds ist aber noch sehr gering (zu Impact mit börsennotierten Wertpapieren siehe DVFA Leitfaden Impact Investing oder meine Umsetzung hier:  Nachhaltigkeitsinvestmentpolitik der Soehnholz Asset Management GmbH).  

100% SDG-Vereinbarkeit: Impactbeispiel 4

Biotage hat seinen Hauptsitz in Uppsala in Schweden und die Hauptabsatzmärkte sind Europa und die USA.  Das Unternehmen bietet Labortechik an, die weltweit u.a. für Medikamenten-, Umwelt- und Lebensmittelqualität sorgen soll. Dazu gehören Trenntechnologien und Lösungen für die analytische und organische Chemie, die von der Forschung über kommerzielle analytische Labors bis hin zu industriellen Anwendungen reichen. Zielkunden sind Pharma-, Biotech-, Diagnostik-, Auftragsforschungs- und Auftragshersteller sowie klinische, forensische und akademische Labors, aber auch Organisationen, die sich mit Lebensmittelsicherheit, sauberem Wasser und ökologischer Nachhaltigkeit befassen. Zu den Produktbereichen des Unternehmens gehören kleine Moleküle und synthetische Therapeutika, Biologika und fortschrittliche Therapeutika, Scale-Up, Diagnostik, analytische Tests sowie Wasser- und Umwelttests.

Das Unternehmen verweist in seinem Jahresbericht 2023 auf Seite 31 unter anderem auf die „Förderung der Forschungs- und Entwicklungsaktivitäten unserer Kunden um therapeutische Durchbrüche bei der Behandlung und, mit den heutigen Biologika und fortschrittlichen Therapeutika, sogar zur Heilung schwerer Krankheiten beizutragen“ (Übersetzt mit der kostenlosen Version von DeepL.com).

Damit erfüllt auch Biotage meinen wichtigsten Nachhaltigkeitsanspruch, nämlich Produkte oder Services anzubieten, die möglichst gut im Einklang mit den Nachhaltigen Entwicklungszielen der Vereinten Nationen (SDG) stehen. Im Fall von Biotage ist das vor allem das Ziel 3 „Gesundheit und Wohlergehen“. Nach meiner Einschätzung und auch nach der meines Nachhaltigkeitsdatenanbieters Clarity.ai sind die kompletten Umsätze gut mit den SDG vereinbar.

Relativ geringe ESG-Risiken

Das aggregierte ESG-Rating liegt bei ordentlichen 60 von 100 im Best-in-Universe-Vergleich, für den alle über 25tausend geraten Unternehmen berücksichtigt werden. Mit fast 70 ist der Governancescore besonders hoch und auch die Sozial- und Umweltscore liegen um die 55 und damit über dem von mir verlangten Mindestwert von 50. Auch von Biotage sind keine Aktivitäten bekannt, die auf meiner zahlreiche Null-Toleranz-Ausschlüsse umfassenden harten Ausschluss- bzw. Liste weiterer unerwünschter Aktivitäten stehen.

Shareholder-Engagement bisher erfolglos (Impactbeispiel 4)

Ich habe Biotage erstmals im Januar 2023 und zuletzt im April 2024 kontaktiert. Zunächst habe ich nach mir fehlenden Nachhaltigkeitsinformationen gefragt. Die erste Anfrage wurde erst spät befriedigend beantwortet. Meine Anregungen zur Messung von GHG Scope 3 Emissionen, zum Ausweis der CEO Pay Ratio, zu ESG-Befragungen von Kunden und Mitarbeitern und Nachhaltigkeitsbewertungen von Lieferanten wurden zur Kenntnis genommen. Sie sollen zumindest in Bezug auf GHG-Emissionen im in Kürze geplanten Nachhaltigkeitsreport adressiert werden.

Die Unternehmen in meinem Portfolio gehören sowohl in Bezug auf Ausschlüsse als auch ESG- und SDG-Kriterien bereits zu den besten weltweit. Alternativinvestment scheiden nach diesen Kriterien etwas schlechter ab und es ist nicht abschätzbar, ob die Engagementreaktion bei diesen Unternehmen besser ausfallen würde. Deshalb führt eine unbefriedigende Reaktion auf meine Engagements bisher nicht zu einem Teil- oder Komplettverkauf der Aktien.

Gute Portfolioergänzung: Impactbeispiel 4

Biotage ist eines von aktuell drei Unternehmen mit Hauptsitz in Schweden. Mit 10% hat Schweden damit einen überproportionalen Anteil am Portfolio. Zwar sind alle drei Gesundheitsunternehmen, aber sie arbeiten in unterschiedlichen Marktsegmenten. Auch aus anderen Ländern ist aktuell kein direkter Wettbewerber von Biotage im Portfolio.

Mit einer Marktkapitalisierung von etwas über einer Milliarde Euro passt Biotage sehr gut zu den anderen fokussierten aber relativ gering kapitalisierten Unternehmen im Portfolio. Seit der Aufnahme der Aktie ins Portfolio hat Biotage dem Fonds einen Verlust von 5% eingebracht.

Informationen zum Fonds

Bisherige Beispiele siehe

Nachhaltiges Investmentbeispiel 1

SDG-Investment 2: Handschuhe aus Australien

Impactbeispiel 3

Insgesamt hat der von mir beratene Fonds seit der Auflage im August 2021 eine ähnliche Performance wie andere globale Small- und Midcapfonds (vgl. z.B. Fonds-Portfolio: Mein Fonds | CAPinside). In den letzten Monaten ist die Performance sogar deutlich besser als die der traditionellen Peergroup (vgl.  Globale Small-Caps: Faire Benchmark für meinen Artikel 9 Fonds? – Responsible Investment Research Blog (prof-soehnholz.com)).

Wie in einem meiner letzten Blogbeiträge detailliert, bietet der Fonds im Vergleich zu durchschnittlichen traditionellen Small- und Midcap-Fonds damit bisher einen „Free Lunch“ in Bezug auf Nachhaltigkeit: Man erhält ein besonders konsequent nachhaltiges Portfolio mit Small- und Midcap-typischen Renditen und Risiken (vgl. Free Lunch: Diversifikation nein, Nachhaltigkeit ja? – Responsible Investment Research Blog (prof-soehnholz.com).

Weiterführende Informationen zu meinen Portfolios gibt es hier: Das-Soehnholz-ESG-und-SDG-Portfoliobuch.pdf (soehnholzesg.com)

Disclaimer

Dieser Beitrag ist von der Soehnholz ESG GmbH erstellt worden. Die Erstellerin übernimmt keine Gewähr für die Richtigkeit, Vollständigkeit und/oder Aktualität der zur Verfügung gestellten Inhalte. Die Informationen unterliegen deutschem Recht und richten sich ausschließlich an Investoren, die ihren Wohnsitz in Deutschland haben. Sie sind keine Finanzanalyse und nicht als Verkaufsangebot oder Aufforderung zur Abgabe eines Kauf- oder Zeichnungsangebots für Anteile der/s in dieser Unterlage dargestellten Aktie/Fonds zu verstehen und ersetzen nicht eine anleger- und anlagegerechte Beratung. Anlageentscheidungen sollten nur auf der Grundlage der aktuellen gesetzlichen Verkaufsunterlagen (Wesentliche Anlegerinformationen, Verkaufsprospekt und – sofern verfügbar – Jahres- und Halbjahresbericht) getroffen werden, die auch die allein maßgeblichen Anlagebedingungen enthalten.

Die Verkaufsunterlagen des Fonds werden bei der Kapitalverwaltungsgesellschaft (Monega Kapitalanlagegesellschaft mbH), der Verwahrstelle (Kreissparkasse Köln) und den Vertriebspartnern zur kostenlosen Ausgabe bereitgehalten. Die Verkaufsunterlagen sind zudem im Internet unter www.monega.de erhältlich. Die in dieser Unterlage zur Verfügung gestellten Inhalte dienen lediglich der allgemeinen Information und stellen keine Beratung oder sonstige Empfehlung dar. Die Kapitalanlage ist stets mit Risiken verbunden und kann zum Verlust des eingesetzten Kapitals führen. Vor einer etwaigen Anlageentscheidung sollten Sie eingehend prüfen, ob die Anlage für Ihre individuelle Situation und Ihre persönlichen Ziele geeignet ist. Diese Unterlage enthält ggf. Informationen, die aus öffentlichen Quellen stammen, die die Erstellerin für verlässlich hält. Die dargestellten Inhalte, insbesondere die Darstellung von Strategien sowie deren Chancen und Risiken, können sich im Zeitverlauf ändern. Einschätzungen und Bewertungen reflektieren die Meinung der Erstellerin zum Zeitpunkt der Erstellung und können sich jederzeit ändern. Es ist nicht beabsichtigt, diese Unterlage laufend oder überhaupt zu aktualisieren. Sie stellt nur eine unverbindliche Momentaufnahme dar. Die Unterlage ist ausschließlich zur Information und zum persönlichen Gebrauch bestimmt. Jegliche nicht autorisierte Vervielfältigung und Weiterverbreitung ist untersagt.

Brown banks: clker free vector images from Pixabay

Brown banks? Researchpost 180

Brown banks picture from clker free vector images from Pixabay

Brown banks: 9x new research on CO2-costs, climate policy effects, Mittelstand climate, stock prices, ESG, CSR, gender diversity, green projects, and listed real estate (# shows the number of SSRN full research paper downloads as of June 13th, 2024)

Social and ecological research

Correct CO2 costs? Synthesis of evidence yields high social cost of carbon due to structural model variation and uncertainties by Frances C. Moore, Moritz A. Drupp, James Rising, Simon Dietz, Ivan Rudik, Gernot Wagner as of June 10th, 2024 (#9): “Estimating the cost to society from a ton of CO2 – termed the social cost of carbon (SCC) – requires connecting a model of the climate system with a representation of the economic and social effects of changes in climate, and the aggregation of diverse, uncertain impacts across both time and space. … we perform a comprehensive synthesis of the evidence on the SCC, combining 1823 estimates of the SCC from 147 studies with a survey of authors of these studies. The distribution of published 2020 SCC values is wide and substantially right-skewed, showing evidence of a heavy right tail (truncated mean of $132). … we train a random forest model on variation in the literature and use it to generate a synthetic SCC distribution that more closely matches expert assessments of appropriate model structure and discounting. This synthetic distribution has a mean of $284 per ton CO2, respectively, for a 2020 pulse year (5%–95% range: $32–$874), higher than all official government estimates … “ (abstract).

Strict policy effects: Climate and Environmental Policy Risk and Debt by Karol Kempa and Ulf Moslener as of April 25th, 2024 (#95): “… we find that policy determines how firms’ externalities, such as CO2 emissions and different types of environmental pollution, translate into credit risks and corporate bond pricing. The size as well as direction of the effect of externalities on credit risk and bond spreads depends on the stringency of policy. Ambitious policy increases the credit risk and costs of debt for dirty firms and decreases both for clean firms. Lenient regulation can have the opposite effect. … Finally, we find that a higher likelihood of stringent climate policies in the future increases the impact of CO2 emissions on credit risk“ (abstract).

Mittelstandsklima: Die unternehmerische Akzeptanz von Klimaschutzregulierung von Markus Rieger-Fels, Susanne Schlepphorst, Christian Dienes, Rodi Akalan, Annette Icks und Hans-Jürgen Wolter vom 3. Juni 2024: „Nur eine starke Volkswirtschaft kann die für den Klimaschutz erforderlichen Ressourcen aufbringen. Die Unternehmen sind dabei in der Mehrzahl bereit, diesen Weg mitzugehen. Speziell die mittelständischen Unternehmerinnen und Unternehmer weisen tendenziell eine hohe intrinsische Motivation auf, zum Schutz der Umwelt und des Klimas beizutragen. Das ist wichtig, da den Unternehmen stets ein strategischer Spielraum in der Umsetzung bleibt. Das Spektrum reicht dabei von einer Standortverlagerung über eine Produktionseinstellung und dem bewussten Ignorieren von Vorgaben bis hin zur freiwilligen Übererfüllung von Regulierungen …“ (p. 26/27). My comment: The reaction of global “Mittelstand” companies regarding my shareholder engagement activities (see Shareholder engagement: 21 science based theses and an action plan – (prof-soehnholz.com)) is more open than I thought

ESG investment research (in: Brown banks)

Brown banks? Banking on climate chaos – Fossil fuel finance report 2024 by Urgewald as of May 13th, 2024: “The 60 biggest banks globally committed $705 B USD to companies conducting business in fossil fuels in 2023, bringing the total since the Paris agreement to $6.9 T. These banks committed $347 billion in 2023 and $3.3 trillion total since 2016 to expansion companies – those companies that the Global Oil & Gas Exit List and the Global Coal Exit List report having expansion plans. … Total financing committed for companies with methane gas (LNG) import and export capacity under development, increased from $116.0 billion in 2022 to $121.0 billion in 2023. … 15.4 % of the financing by dollar value issued in 2023 matures after 2030; 3.7 % matures after 2050. Financing for fossil fuel extraction or infrastructure that matures after 2030 faces a risk of becoming stranded … several banks, including Bank of America and PNC, rolled back their previous exclusions in 2023 (see p. 32). Banks continue to prioritize net zero targets, though early research suggests that these targets, like other bank policies, leave loopholes for ongoing fossil fuel finance (see p. 35)” (p. 4). My comment: Check out you bank based on the detailed data: Banking on Climate Chaos 2024 – Banking on Climate Chaos

Climate correlations: The Cold Hard Cash Effect: Temperature’s Role in Shaping Stock Market Outcomes by Yosef Bonaparte as of April 15th, 2024 (#8): “The analysis conducted across 67 countries …highlight that warmer climates are linked to lower stock market returns, with a notable economic significance exceeding 9.12%, and reduced volatility, demonstrating an economic significance of at least 36.9%. Conversely, the Sharpe ratio, serving as a gauge of risk-adjusted returns, displays a positive co-movement with temperature change, indicating an economic significance surpassing 1.63%. Furthermore, cold countries earn greater stock market returns but are more negatively affected by temperature changes” (p. 16).

ESG or CSR? Combining CSR and ESG for Sustainable Business Transformation: When Corporate Purpose Gets a Reality Check by David Risi, Eva Schlindwein and Christopher Wickert as of June 7th, 2024 (#135): “ESG is a compliance-driven and metrics-oriented idea for stimulating sustainable business transformation. It focuses on reducing negative impacts and improving performance in specific areas. Moreover, it provides a reality check on how a firm is doing in light of increasing societal expectations for greater sustainability. By contrast, CSR is often viewed as a more values-based and internally driven approach to sustainability. It provides a strategy for developing a sense of meaning and purpose for responsible business conduct that reflects a firm’s values and identity… In their mutual integration, CSR and ESG create synergy since they can compensate for their respective weaknesses” (p. 12/13).

Good diversity: Board Gender Diversity and Investment Efficiency: Global Evidence from 83 Country-Level Interventions by Dave (Young Il) Baik, Clara Xiaoling Chen, and David Godsell as of May 4th, 2024 (#177): “We document increases in firms’ investment efficiency after the adoption of BGD interventions relative to firms in countries that do not concurrently adopt BGD interventions. Our results are economically significant, suggesting that treatment firms reduce inefficient investment by 0.6 percent of total assets or 6.5 percent of total investment and are 4 percentage points more likely to have above-median investment efficiency after interventions relative to firms in countries not concurrently adopting interventions“ (p. 33). My comment: I recently divested from a company because the social rating declined which was mainly due to low gender worker and board diversity

Impact investment research

Small climate steps: Inside the Blackbox of Firm Environmental Efforts: Evidence from Emissions Reduction Initiatives by Catrina Achilles, Peter Limbach, Michael Wolff and Aaron Yoon as of June 7th, 2024 (#35): “This study uses granular data at the firm’s project level, provided by the Carbon Disclosure Project, to present primary evidence on what large U.S. firms actually do to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. … the majority of emissions reduction projects require small investments – the median investment per project is $127,000, with the median of firms’ total annual investment in such projects amounting to only 0.2% of net income. Second, 63% of all projects have payback periods of at most three years, while just about 10% of all projects pay off after more than ten years. These short-term projects mostly target energy efficiency in buildings or production, and typically do not involve new transformative technology and low-carbon energy. … our results suggest that short-term emissions reduction projects generate more CO2e and monetary savings per year, yield greater NPVs, and predict higher environment-related ESG ratings in the near future. However, total CO2e savings over the projects’ lifetime are at least 25% lower for short-term payback projects. Firms that exhibit the most CO2e savings have a mix of short- and longer-term projects, while firms exclusively implementing only short-term or longer-term projects save significantly less CO2e. We also study how characteristics of firms’ emissions reduction projects, such as their payback period and efficiency in saving CO2e, evolve over time and show which firms implement more short-term projects …. the evidence presented in this paper suggests that the majority of large U.S. firms do not act … long-term oriented” (p. 31/32).  

Other investment research (in: Brown banks)

Real estate hedge: U.S. and European Listed Real Estate as an Inflation Hedge by Jan Muckenhaupt, Martin Hoesli and Bing Zhu as of May 28th, 2024 (#27): “This paper investigates the inflation-hedging capability of an important asset class, i.e., listed real estate (LRE), using data from 1990 to the end of 2023 … Listed real estate provides an effective hedge against inflation in the long run, both in crisis and non-crisis periods. In the short term, listed real estate only hedges against inflation in stable periods. LRE effectively serves as a hedge against inflation shocks, particularly protecting against unexpected inflation from the first month and against energy inflation during stable periods. While stocks surpass LRE in long-term inflation protection and LRE has short-term benefits, gold distinguishes itself from LRE by offering reliable long-run protection, but only in economic downturns” (abstract). My comment: My “most-passive” multi-asset ETF portfolios have a target allocation of 10-12% Listed Real Estate, 5 to 6 % Listed Infrastructure and 5% US Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Werbehinweis

Unterstützen Sie meinen Researchblog, indem Sie in meinen globalen Small-Cap-Anlagefonds (SFDR Art. 9) investieren und/oder ihn empfehlen. Der Fonds konzentriert sich auf die Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDG: Investment impact) und verwendet separate E-, S- und G-Best-in-Universe-Mindestratings sowie ein breites Aktionärsengagement (Investor impact) bei derzeit 29 von 30 Unternehmen:  My fund – Responsible Investment Research Blog (prof-soehnholz.com). Zur jetzt wieder guten Performance siehe zum Beispiel Fonds-Portfolio: Mein Fonds | CAPinside